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April 8th, 2009 No comments
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Sanjay Kamble – watercolour landscape artist

April 4th, 2009 No comments
Sanjay Kamble

Sanjay V. Kamble was born in the tiny village of Vaduj Dist. Satara. He did reasonably well in school but found an inclination towards the Arts in his early years. He pursued his passion at the renowned JJ Art school in Mumbai, LS Raheja, Bandra School of Art and Abhinav Kala Mahavidyalaya in Pune, Maharashtra. He then started his professional career as a Freelance Illustrator doing caricatures for comics and all kinds of work for National and Multinational advertising agencies and newspapers in Mumbai. A one job assignment then took him all the way to Dubai. Since then he has been serving as a successful Art Director and a full-time freelance illustrator including finding time for his first love – painting. Read more…

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Company paintings of India

April 4th, 2009 No comments

Different Strokes

Native artists were encouraged to paint images of Indian life which reflected the social fabric of the period.

By the late 18th century, the British emerged as the dominant power in India, encouraging middle-class young Englishmen to join the East India Company as civilians and soldiers. The newcomers were fascinated by the variegated landscape of the country, its magnificent monuments and the diversity of its people. They wanted to acquire pictures of their new environment, but not all of them could afford to buy the works of noted British artists engaged in portraying the scenic splendour of India and its exotic people. As a result, British residents and travellers started commissioning native artists to create paintings of their chosen subjects. They were keen to collect them as mementos and souvenirs for their friends and relatives in England. For the British, almost every aspect of life in India was worth sketching. Their favourite subjects, however, were historic monuments with their novel architecture, people of different classes in colourful costumes, festivals and rituals, crafts and occupations, different modes of transport, and nautch girls. Read more…

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Indian women in British Indian Paintings

April 4th, 2009 No comments

Legacy of Intimacy

One of the most popular artists of British India, Sir Charles D’Oyly was known for his perceptive delineation of Indian women in the 19th century.

British artists began arriving in India in the 1760s. They were the first to draw true-to-life pictures of the Indian panorama. Lured by the prospect of fame and fortune, most professional artists engaged themselves in making portraits of the sahibs and native princes or pictures of historical events of imperial interest. The amateur artists, on the other hand, applied their talents to depicting Indian people and their way of life. Some were very talented and their works were of a high standard. They had received training in drawing and water colour paintings, which formed an essential part of the liberal education in England those days. The professional artists in Calcutta gave drawing lessons to sahibs and memsahibs interested in art. Read more…

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Paintings of India – A Brush with History

April 4th, 2009 No comments

Eminent photographer Benoy K. Behl’s film The Paintings of India reveals the subtleties of the art tradition in the country writes Mitali Kar.

There is an air of hurried activity at Benoy K. Behl’s studio in New Delhi. The well-known lensman and art historian, best known for photographing the Ajanta paintings in their true colours, and the author of the Thames and Hudson published book The Ajanta Caves, is discussing the background score for a series of 26 documentary films to be aired on Doordarshan next year. Matthew Kurien, the computer artist is busy “cleaning up” images on the computer, while Latika Gupta, assistant director is sifting through heaps of transparencies. Sangitika Nigam, a fellow art historian, is coordinating the work. It may seem a long way until next year but Behl is in a hurry and one can’t blame him. He is covering 40 districts spread across eight states in only 45 days from the middle of October. Read more…

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Jewellery art of India

April 4th, 2009 No comments

Mughal, Persian and Western fashions have influenced ethnic jewellery for years. While assimilating changes, Indian jewellery has retained its own identity and created a huge domestic market.

From time immemorial, jewellery has been an important part of festivals and celebrations. Gold, more than any other metal, has been used by artisans and crafstmen to make brilliant and exquisite pieces of jewellery. In India, gold jewellery has evolved from an amalgamation of various cultures, traditions and customs. At the same time, influences of foreign culture can be seen in designs. This has led to cross-cultural exchanges resulting in the creation of unique pieces of jewellery. Read more…

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Sacred Walls of Kerala

April 4th, 2009 No comments

Said to be the museum of India, Kerala, in the south-west, reflects countless forms of ritual, classical, martial and folk arts.

Prayer to reach and please the Gods, to communicate with them and live in their sacred presence is achieved through different forms of art. It can be expressed through graceful or vigorous dances, mythological dramas displaying heroism, humour and devotion, melodious singing or powerful percussions, the composing and chanting of verses and carving or painting the forms of Gods or their divine activities. Read more…

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Glass Art from India

April 4th, 2009 No comments

Although the process of mirror-making in India has not changed over time, the use of mirrors in textiles and as decorations in homes is petering out. Victoria Z. Rivers however, discovers a small village in Gujarat where mirror-makers use traditional methods to produce mirrored spheres which are later used by the tribal communities to embellish their homes and textiles. Read more…

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Where doors tell tales – art of doors

April 2nd, 2009 No comments

The architectural heritage of India is interleaved with images of a long and ancient history that has patterned the philosophy and lifestyle of its people so that there is an infinite variety of architectural forms. Grandiose palaces, venerable temples, churches, mosques and monumental tombs dot the country.

In particular, the doorway has always been the focus of design as it holds a special significance in every aspect of thought. Read more…

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Paintings in the British Raj

April 2nd, 2009 No comments

By the late 18th century, the British emerged as the dominant power in India, encouraging middle-class young Englishmen to join the East India Company as civilians and soldiers. The newcomers were fascinated by the variegated landscape of the country, its magnificent monuments and the diversity of its people. They wanted to acquire pictures of their new environment, but not all of them could afford to buy the works of noted British artists engaged in portraying the scenic splendour of India and its exotic people. As a result, British residents and travellers started commissioning native artists to create paintings of their chosen subjects. They were keen to collect them as mementos and souvenirs for their friends and relatives in England. For the British, almost every aspect of life in India was worth sketching. Their favourite subjects, however, were historic monuments with their novel architecture, people of different classes in colourful costumes, festivals and rituals, crafts and occupations, different modes of transport, and nautch girls. Read more…

Categories: Indian Art Tags: